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What's In Your Water?

Updated: Jan 22


what's in your water, pouring water into  glass


What's in Your RO or Reverse Osmosis Water


RO Water is one of the best filtering systems on the market for consumers and for bottled water. However, RO does not take out of VOCs, chlorine, or chlorine - all bad stuff.

The downside is that Reverse Osmosis takes everything out of the water. So what is left is acid water with no minerals. Your body can actually take minerals from your bones, leading to early bone loss.

Also on the negative side:

  • The need for power. If the power goes out, you have a paperweight.

  • The RO process creates a lot of wastewater - up to 75%! Waste 3 units of water to make one filtered unit.

  • Then there is the possible bone loss issue.


What's in Your Well Water

Well water is considered to be one of the best-filtered sources. With good source water, well water is probably one of the best spruces of filtered water.

However, without water testing, which can be expensive, you do not know what is in your water. Also, the ground source water is affected by local water conditions. Farming, manufacturing, mining, local mineral deposits, and pollution factors raise the need to test well water.


Want to know more about the water in your area? First, sit down and prepare yourself, then click on this link.


What's in Your Tap Water


Tap water is not potable in a lot of countries. Therefore it has to be boiled first before use.

Even in North America, all tap water is not drinkable. For instance, the Michigan water crisis, the Flint, and the First Nations indigenous water crisis in Canada are still not fully resolved.

Water is supposed to be tasteless, but we all know that tap water can be tasty.


The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) study in 2003 showed that public water supplies in 19 of America's biggest cities delivered drinking water that its contaminant level exceeded EPA limits, including arsenic, rocket fuel, lead, chemical byproducts, and fecal waste.


What's in Your Bottled Water

NRDC's study showed that approximately 25% of bottled water is nothing more than just tap water. The best way to find out? Read the label on the bottle to find out if it says anything about how the water is filtered. If it does not mention the filtering processes, then chances are it is just tap water.


A big problem associated with bottled water is the plastic bottle itself. Some plastic bottles contain a chemical called bisphenol A, also known as BPA. This chemical has been linked to many health issues, such as obesity, infertility, diabetes, insomnia, heart disease, arthritis, and many more. Also, the plastic bottles add to the trash that goes into the oceans and landfills, adding to environmental degradation.

So What Can You Do? What is the Best Option for Drinking Water?


The short answer: the best option is drinking filtered water.


From a cost standpoint, the Food and Water Watch Organization reports that even expensive water filters are more cost-effective than bottled water, especially when evaluating costs over a 5, 10, and 20-year period.

The water filters provide the last line of defense between our body and the more than 2,200 known toxins present in drinking water.

Water experts recommend using a water filter that satisfies the NSF International standards, a nonprofit organization that carries out research and safety testing for water and food industries. Look specifically for what type of contaminants the water filter will remove.


What's in your Filtered Water?


That is a loaded question. Most people think they are drinking healthy water. So they think there isn't much in their water. Very little is further from the truth.


Water experts recommend using a water filter that satisfies the NSF International standards, a nonprofit osrganization that carries out research and safety testing for water and food industries. They look specifically for what type of contaminants the water filter will remove.


A Word of Caution


If you see an NSF standard 42 advertised, it is not a healthy filtering option. Its purpose is to make water from city water systems taste better.


Refrigerator filters are standard 42. They do nothing, let's say that again, nothing to filter out the unhealthy stuff in water. Most filtering pitcher types are the same.


Look for NSF standards:

  • NSF 53 or Testing data showing a list contaminate elimination and of VOCs.

  • NSF 372 for Lead. Lead is nasty stuff and STILL a problem in Flint, Michigan.

  • Testing data for chloramine reduction or elimination. Large cities add chloramine to water to help kill organic matter. It kills organic nasties in pipes, but remember you are organic too, so it's not good for you.

To get any benefit form filtered water you need NSF 53 and 372 at a minimum.


Are there solutions?


Yes. Nikken PiMAG Waterfall, Berkey Water, and for low use, some LifeStraw products. We have reviews of those products.





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